VOTE 2019 – Candidate information

Nominations for local government candidates open 19th July and close 12noon 16th August.

Deciding to play a significant role in your local community by running for local government is a big decision. The videos that follow have been put together by Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) and will give you an insight in to what you can expect in each of the various roles you might choose to put yourself forward for in the 2019 Elections. You’ll be hearing from real people – with real experience.

Each video begins with what you can expect to learn about by the end of the video. Please feel free to watch the videos all at once or one at a time. It is best to view the videos on the latest version of Chrome to avoid any technical issues.

You can also find more detailed information for candidates on the LGNZ website http://www.lgnz.co.nz/vote2019/.

QUALIFYING AS A CANDIDATE

Qualifying as a Candidate for Council

To qualify as a candidate for election to a district or regional council, you must be:

  • Enrolled as a parliamentary elector anywhere in New Zealand
  • A New Zealand citizen
  • You do not have to live in the area or ward that you stand for, but you must be nominated by people who do live there.
  • Restrictions

You cannot stand for election to both the Masterton District Council (as Mayor or Councillor) and the Greater Wellington Regional Council. 

You cannot stand for election to more than one ward or constituency of the same authority, butyou can stand for Mayor and your preferred ward.  As there are no longer wards in the Masterton District Council election this means that you can stand for Mayor and for council.

You cannot have concerns or interests in contracts over $25,000 with the local authority. However, this may be waived if, before standing, you get approval from the Office of the Auditor-General. 

If you are employed by a local authority and are elected as mayor or councillor of that local authority, you must resign as an employee before taking up the position as an elected member. The rules of an individual local authority may mean that an employee has to take leave of absence for campaigning purposes before the election. 

Qualifying as a Candidate for Other Local Elections

If you are standing for a district health board or local Trust, you can also stand for mayor, the district council, or the regional council but you will be subject to the restrictions outlined above.

District Health Board (DHB)

To qualify as a candidate for election to a district health board, you must be:

  • Enrolled as a parliamentary elector anywhere in New Zealand.
  • A New Zealand citizen.
  • Not disqualified by either clause 17, Schedule 2 of the New Zealand Public Health and Disability Act 2000 or section 30(2)(a) to (f) Crown Entities Act 2004.
  • You can only stand for one district health board.

Masterton Trust Lands Trust

To qualify as a candidate for election to the Masterton Trust Lands Trust, you must be:

  • Enrolled as a parliamentary elector anywhere in New Zealand (whether within or outside the Trust district).
  • A New Zealand citizen.
  • Masterton Community Trust

To qualify as a candidate for election to the Masterton Community Trust, you must be:

  • A resident of the Community Trust district.
  • Enrolled as a parliamentary elector anywhere in New Zealand.
  • A New Zealand citizen.
  • Not disqualified from standing as a member of the Trust by any of the provisions of section 376 of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012.
  • Montfort Trimble Foundation

To qualify as a candidate for election to the Montfort Trimble Foundation, you must be:

  • Enrolled as a parliamentary elector anywhere in New Zealand.
  • A New Zealand citizen.
     

 

 

Video 1. Standing for local government (25 minutes)

Purpose: To introduce you to the elected member roles available to you, including a description of what elected members do. By the end of this video you will be able to:

  • Clarify the value of the elected member role and what can be achieved
  • Describe the three types of local authority, and the roles within each
  • Consider what elected members actually do.

Video 2. What do you need to be an elected member? (6 minutes)

Purpose: To help you think about what skills you will need to have and behaviours you will need to display as an elected member and what sort of support will be available to help.                                                                                  

By the end of this video you will be able to:

  • Review the important skills needed to be an elected member and what behaviours you will need to display
  • Clarify the value of diversity around the council table
  • Think about what sort of things you might like to learn more about.

Video 3. How councils work (16 minutes)

Purpose: To help you find out about how councils work and are funded.                       

By the end of this video you will be able to:

  • Describe how councils operate and are funded
  • Explain how councils make decisions
  • Find out about elected members’ pay.

Video 4. Nomination requirements (3 minutes)

Purpose: To help you understand the next steps to take, if you have decided to stand for local government.                                                      

By the end of this video you will be able to:

  • Explain how the electoral process works
  • Complete the local government nomination requirements
  • Think about the types of campaigning methods that will work for you.

Video 5. Your first days as an elected member (5 minutes)

Purpose: To give you an idea of what to expect if you are successfully elected.  

By the end of this video you will be able to:

  • Describe what happens in the first month after the election if you are elected
  • Get important dates into your diary so that you are available for those essential first meetings.